What Does It Mean To Live In A Sober House?

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Addiction, also known as substance use disorder, is listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) as a chronic, relapsing brain disorder. It is characterized by compulsively engaging in rewarding stimuli (e.g., abusing drugs and/ or alcohol) without regard for consequence. An individual that struggles with addiction will prioritize satisfying his or her drug cravings above all else. The development of substance use disorder does not occur immediately, nor will recovering from addiction be achieved instantaneously. The path of recovery from substance abuse and/ or addiction is not necessarily linear, nor will it be the same for every person. The treatment process for substance abuse and/ or addiction is generally comprised of a detox phase, substance abuse and/ or addiction treatment program, and an aftercare plan. Depending on the situation, an individual may elect to move into a sober living facility after the completion of a substance abuse and/ or addiction treatment program as a component of his or her aftercare plan. 

Sober Livings

Sober living homes provide individuals that have completed a substance abuse and/ or addiction treatment program a structured residential environment that is free of drugs and alcohol. Although each sober living home has its own set of house rules, residential requirements, and offers different amenities, all sober living residents have the same primary goal for their residents: to remain sober. Sober living facilities offer an individual in recovery an opportunity to continue to practice implementing the lessons and skills learned during treatment, without being exposed to the triggers that may otherwise present when immediately returning to one’s home environment. The purpose of a sober living facility is not to shield individuals from reality, but instead to help people take the necessary preparatory steps to fully reintegrate into society and further strengthen their foundation of recovery to enable prolonged and sustained sobriety. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the length of time an individual spends in substance abuse treatment (including sober living) can directly increase her outcome in recovery. Moving into a sober living home is indisputable evidence of one’s commitment to prioritizing his or her recovery.

For Information and Support 

If you are concerned for yourself or a loved one regarding substance abuse and/ or addiction, we recommend reaching out for help as soon as possible. If left untreated, substance abuse can result in long-lasting and potentially life-threatening consequences. Keep in mind: you are not alone! There is an entire network of professionals that are available to help and support you and your loved one throughout the recovery process. The earlier you seek support, the sooner your loved one can return to a happy, healthy, and fulfilling life.

Please do not hesitate to reach out with any questions regarding our specific program at Haven House Addiction Treatment and/ or general substance abuse and/ or addiction treatment-related information. Our highly trained staff is readily available to discuss how we might best be able to help you and your loved one. We can be reached by phone at 424-318-3777. You are also welcome to contact anytime us via email at admissions@hhtxc.com.

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